LGBT people continue to be humiliated, persecuted and maimed in Russia.

On December 19, 2012, LGBT representatives staged a Kissing Day rally in front of the State Duma in protest against the law on gay propaganda. Immediately after the start of the action, they were pelted with rotten eggs.
Evgeny Feldman

Eight years ago, on June 30, 2013, a law on “gay propaganda” came into force in Russia, prohibiting the “promotion of non-traditional sexual relations” among minors. Contrary to the law, LGBT people in Russian society have become noticeably more noticeable over the years, and much more information about the problems and life of the community has appeared in the public space. However, government-backed homophobia has intensified. Non-heterosexual Russians regularly become targets of aggression, to which the authorities actually incite. Here are some examples of the consequences of homophobia, which has become part of the state ideology.

Legal prosecution of LGBT activists, bloggers and journalists.

It is still dangerous to openly declare oneself as an LGBT person in the public space of Russia and to cover the life of queer people. In addition, it is impossible to predict which actions can attract the attention of security officials – and what, on the contrary, can protect them from this.

For example, a criminal case was opened against activist Yulia Tsvetkova (she is accused of distributing pornography) because of harmless drawings on the topic of body positive. Tsvetkova has already received several administrative fines under the article on “promoting non-traditional sexual relations among minors”. In March 2021, the Ostankino District Court banned the distribution of a video by journalist Karen Shahinyan about LGBT parenting (although it is still available on YouTube).

Complaining about “propaganda” is a convenient formal excuse for canceling cultural events and lectures. So, in April 2021, a charity evening in support of LGBT people “Show me love” was disrupted: the police and activists of the pro-Kremlin radical movements NOD and SERB came there. They also disrupted the St. Petersburg Artdokfest, after which Moscow canceled the screening of the film A Quiet Voice, which was in the festival’s competition program (a documentary film about a homosexual refugee from Chechnya – an MMA fighter).

Sometimes, in order to be detained, it is enough to pull the rainbow flag out of the bag, as happened with the teenagers in the St. Petersburg loft “Etazhi” (in June 2021, the prosecutor’s office declared the detention illegal). The main offense of LGBT + in the eyes of the state is not “propaganda”, but simply the appearance and very existence of queer people; in fact, they have no right to declare themselves openly. In the official discourse, they are given the place of marginality, cartoons, and any attempt to change this status quo is persecuted.

Crystallization of the enemy image. News about LGBT people is not journalism, but hate speech.

Most media outside the independent sector write about LGBT + people outside of most ethical and professional standards. For example, here is how Izvestia explains what Pride Month is (in the news about the rainbow flag hung on the British Embassy in Moscow): there are parades of sexual minorities, during which representatives of gay people propagandize tolerance towards members of their community and the ideas of LGBT people. “

In addition to deliberate emotional coloring, which helps to present queer people in a negative light (“promote tolerance”), this text is full of outdated incorrect terms: “sexual minorities”, “non-traditional orientation”. However, the language that journalists of the pro-government media use to write about LGBT people actually replicates the manner in which the head of state speaks. A year ago, Vladimir Putin commented on the rainbow flag hung at the US Embassy in honor of Pride Month: “Yes, they showed something about who works there. Not scary”.

In fact, this is nothing more than hate speech; from news sites, this vocabulary wanders into everyday life and becomes the language of conversation in the kitchen. Even people who position themselves as allies, that is, those who support the struggle for the rights of LGBT people, often allow themselves controversial actions. For example, the singer Lolita, who for many years was considered a gay icon in Russia (it was she who sang the unofficial LGBT anthem “Stop the Earth, I’ll Get Down,” sounded in Felix Mikhailov’s film Veselchaki, 2009), has been consistently defending the protective initiatives of the State Duma deputies for many years. and now Senator Elena Mizulina, including the law on “gay propaganda”. The singer does not consider him discriminatory; it adopts and retransmits the idea that this is a legal norm aimed exclusively at protecting the interests of children.

Language largely determines our attitude to phenomena: if we constantly hear about “LGBT ideas” (mentioned in the Izvestia article quoted above), then we will really perceive LGBT people not as ordinary people, but as carriers of an aggressive ideology, among which have no other goals than the desire to obtain new channels for the dissemination of their views.

One of the objectively existing difficulties in covering LGBT issues is that specialized vocabulary is updated too quickly. Fortunately, there are many guides out there on how to properly write about LGBT +. For example, Takie Dela has prepared a short thesaurus of words that describe different gender identities. Sasha Kazantseva – journalist, blogger, editor of the queer-zine “Otkrytye” – together with the trans-initiative group “T-Action” published the book “How to write about transgender and not screw it up”; it, by the way, is in the free public domain.

Censorship is being tightened (including self-censorship).

A direct consequence of the 2013 law is censorship and self-censorship, when a person tries to protect himself from voluntaristic law enforcement, removing any hints about a sensitive topic, according to the authorities. This includes the actions of film distributors: from the film “Rocketman” (a biopic about Elton John) they cut scenes of intimacy between men, from the film “Supernova” – three “extra” minutes of gay sex, without which the film begins to look like a parable about strong male friendship , not a story about a couple of older gay men.

At the Docker Festival in June 2021, for example, the main competition showed films about queer people – Her Moms and Prince of Dreams. From the descriptions of the feeds on the site, it was not clear that we were talking about queer people. “Her Moms” is like a film about fleeing the country and adopting a child from an orphanage, while the English-language page of the film clearly states that this is a documentary about two women who are raising an adopted child together, and their emigration is a consequence of the toughening of homophobic rhetoric in Hungary.

Brands also resort to self-censorship: for example, Adidas brought a part of the 2021 Love Unites pride collection to Russia, but on the main page of adidas.ru, unlike the English version, there is no information about this. If you enter the name of the collection (Love Unites) in the search box, you can see a list of things available in the Russian online store: the description says that summer is “a time of bright colors and spectacular images”. But not Pride Month.

Employees of Adidas stores were instructed not to tell customers about the essence of the collection, but to answer only “on the details of the product itself”: an internal mailing list for employees (available to Meduza) said what Pride Month is and how the abbreviation LGBT + stands. However, in addition to information and infographics, there was an urgent request “not to post photos of the Pride Month celebration on external social networks.”

Nike also released the Be True pride collection in 2021, but there is no information about it on the Russian-language website. The paradox is that the Russian media write about the pride collections of global brands, but the brands themselves, if they bring some of the things to Russia, try not to advertise this fact.

Homophobic and transphobic violence continues in Russia.

In 2017, Novaya Gazeta reported on the mass arrest of “Chechen gays”. American documentary filmmaker David France’s film Welcome to Chechnya (2021 won a BAFTA) is dedicated to this.

But the persecution of LGBT people in the Caucasus did not end at all: in June 2021, Khalimat Taramova, a girl from Chechnya who ran away from home, was abducted – she was subjected to violence there because of her sexual orientation. Despite international publicity and calls from activists to pay attention to the persecution of LGBT people in Chechnya and Dagestan, the very existence of such a problem is denied by the Russian authorities.

In Russia, there are no official statistics on crimes motivated by homophobia, but even recorded cases say that violence against LGBT + people is state-sponsored behavior, for which in most cases there will be no responsibility. But not always: in March 2021, the Frunzensky Court of St. Petersburg passed a verdict in the case of extortion from homosexual men, in which 18 people were injured. The old scheme is fake dates. The Russian LGBT network received information that local police officers are organizing fake dates in the Krasnodar Territory. But often the criminals only pretend to be police officers – they threaten with physical harm or plant drugs. The most common mechanism for finding victims is fake profiles on gay dating sites.

LGBT parents are also attacked by the authorities: in 2019, for the first time, a criminal case was opened against employees of the social protection department, who allowed the adoption of children by a homosexual couple in Moscow. In September 2020, the Investigative Committee opened a case for “trafficking in newborn children” and announced that it was going to arrest gay fathers who had resorted to the services of surrogate mothers.

“The most vulnerable are LGBT families with children,” says Olga Baranova, an LGBT activist and project manager at the Moscow Community Center for LGBT + Initiatives. – According to this law, if you are a lesbian, gay or transgender and you have a child, then you have already broken the law. That is, you simply live constantly outside the law in fear that your child may be taken away from you. In history, unfortunately, there are examples of similar persecutions against a certain group of people. It would seem that these are all relics of the past, but no, in Russia now, with respect to the LGBT community, they operate according to the same scheme. They are not yet burnt, but, apparently, because it is impossible to burn fires in our streets. “

There are no effective legal remedies for LGBT parents. If the state decides to purposefully destroy such a family, it will be impossible to prevent it, and emigration remains the only way to ensure safety for itself and its family. And for those for whom such an option is unacceptable, it remains to live as unnoticed as possible – for the state and professional fighters against LGBT +.

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For the fifth year in a row, Major General Moskalkova has presented a report to Putin without mentioning the problems of the LGBT community.

For the fifth year in a row, Major General Tatyana Moskalkova, Ombudsman for Human Rights in the Russian Federation, has presented a final report, which does not contain any place to mention the problems of the LGBT community.

65-year-old Tatiana Moskalkova in early April presented to President Vladimir Putin another report on the situation in the field of human rights. The 500-page document does not contain a single mention of the specific concerns of the LGBT community. The word with the root “sex” is used twice, the word “gender” is used once.

As in previous years, the problems of the transgender community have been completely ignored. There is not a single mention of the violation of the rights of HIV-positive people.

On April 22, with applause, deputies of the State Duma re-elected Tatyana Moskalkova to the post of Commissioner for Human Rights in the Russian Federation for a new term. Only two deputies voted against, one abstained.

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Convict camps for LGBT activists urged to create in the State Duma.

In the State Duma, during the parliamentary hearings on demography problems, it was proposed to toughen the responsibility for the so-called “propaganda of non-traditional relations.” A prominent representative of the ruling party, Deputy Milonov, said yesterday what awaits LGBT activists. According to him, it is necessary to create concentration camps for them, sending them to forced labor in uranium mines.

“… For them, special camps should be made, mixed with uranium mines, for LGBT propagandists there should be hard labor,” said the 47-year-old United Russia party, quoted by the NSN.

“From my point of view, the time has come to tighten a number of articles. This is due to the implementation of propaganda on the Internet. If we are talking about working LGBT organizations that are not particularly hiding and are engaged in direct propaganda of this rubbish among our children. Klimova (Elena Klimova, creator of the project “Children 404”, left LGBT activism in 2020) and her comrades-in-arms, I would imprison them for life. They climb on social networks to our children with this idiocy, as it happens in the group “Children 404”. Administrative punishment for such activities is too softly. This should be dealt with by the SK … “- reasoned Milonov.

“I believe,” continued United Russia, “that those who are doing this should be in prison, like rapists and maniacs. Regular administration of these groups is no longer an administrative violation. These people should not be attributed to our drunks and those who crosses the road at a red light. In terms of severity, this can not be compared … “- insists Milonov.

Earlier it was reported: the United Russia party highly appreciated the activities of the notorious homon-hater Milonov. He is included in the list of “promising single-mandate candidates”. In February, Milonov proposed “to assign homosexual status” and to put the appropriate stamp in the civil passport. The holders of the stamp will be deprived of a number of constitutional rights. In particular, freedom of movement and education.

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VKontakte blocked the Alliance of Heterosexuals and LGBT People for Equality at the request of Roskomnadzor.

The social network VKontakte, at the request of Roskomnadzor, blocked the Alliance of Heterosexuals and LGBT People for Equality. This was reported by the VKontakte press service.

The blocking was based on the decision of the Metallurgical District Court of the city of Chelyabinsk. The notice states that “this index of the website page on the Internet contains information, the dissemination of which in the Russian Federation is prohibited by a court decision.”

The Metallurgical District Court of Chelyabinsk recognized the information in the community “Alliance of Heterosexuals and LGBT People for Equality” banned from distribution on the territory of the Russian Federation on December 11, 2019.

Thus, the court granted the prosecutor’s petition, who argued that the community “clearly promotes non-traditional sexual relations, namely homosexuality, lesbianism, bisexual relationships, transgender people,” and also creates “a positive image of public order violators and a negative one – of law enforcement officers”.

The Alliance of Heterosexuals and LGBT People for Equality calls itself a social movement that unites heterosexuals who support the struggle for LGBT equality and LGBT people themselves. More than 30 thousand users have subscribed to the public movement on VKontakte.

Social media regulation in Russia is tightening. On February 1, a law came into force, according to which social networks must independently identify and block prohibited content, and huge fines are provided for refusing to delete such information. Earlier, VKontakte received a fine of 1.5 million rubles for failure to remove calls to participate in rallies. Repeated violation may result in a fine of one tenth of the annual proceeds.

In Russia, since 2013, a law has been in force that prohibits the “propaganda of non-traditional sexual relations” among minors. This law is used to prosecute LGBT people and fight projects on this topic.

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The State Duma told about the daily blocking of 200 LGBT groups in social networks.

Lyudmila Stebenkova

Lyudmila Stebenkova, a deputy from United Russia, spoke about her intention to introduce new bans on the “propaganda” of gender reassignment, polyamory, bisexuality, etc.

“At our meeting there were a lot of young people from legal institutions. One of them spoke and said that if you go to social networks today, recruit a specific group, you will see that what is being promoted there contradicts all the norms of the law …” – said 62-year-old Stebenkova in an interview with Fontanka, commenting on the proposal for new bans. She clarified that it is about “transsexuality, bisexuality and LGBT”.

According to Stebenkova, every day up to 200 such groups are “closed by law enforcement agencies and Roskomnadzor.” “I’m telling you this about the existing law enforcement practice,” Stebenkova said, adding: “If you want to reduce the interview to issues of propaganda of gay, I will answer with one phrase. I believe that propaganda of gay, childfree, transgender and all kinds of similar trends does not contribute to an increase in the birth rate in the country and to overcome the demographic crisis. And this is where we will finish. “

Earlier it was reported: in the resolution of the conference “Legal and legislative aspects of supporting families and family values ​​in the Russian Federation”, which was held on March 4 in the State Duma as part of the project of the United Russia party – “Strong Family”, there is a demand to toughen the responsibility for homopropaganda, as well as to establish the prohibition of propaganda is a lot of things – from polyamory to transsexuality.

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